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Are you sure you know who you are?

Written by: Nghi Dang I assume that if you are here, you are also involved in intercultural field in one way or another. And we also have great passion for it. Personally, I have grown interest in the field since I moved to Finland. Being able to see a totally different society, I would be lying to say if I was not having problems adapting. However, if one asks me, whether I had a cultural shock moving to a continent across the globe at such an early age, I usually said no. I have been sincerely honest with such an...

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Learning by drawing on experience and promoting activism

November 21, 2014 By George F. Simons This review is from: Intercultural Communication for Everyday Life (Paperback) Baldwin and his team have unapologetically placed intercultural communication in the context of everyday life, but don't be fooled, as "everyday life" for the authors is focused on the challenges of dealing with culture in its full impact on real coexistence with oneself and others. That means addressing ethics, politics, and economics as well as managing diverse relationships. In short it stresses civic and political engagement enlightened by building an understanding of how culture works and how we experience it at home and...

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Two Kinds of Cultures

In the reduced level of understanding created by diversity, a transcultural leader or manager must be able to shift back and forth from a mindset which says that communicating means saying something to someone else that will further a' relationship out of which appropriate actions will come, to a one which sees communicating as a collaborative effort between people to create meaning and action together. The first mindset is more representative of a higher context, or what we choose to call a "more tightly woven" (MTW) culture where the participants share a larger context of understanding whenever they speak to...

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Grow up & play! Games & Simulation in Intercultural Learning

George Simons & Katrin Volt                                                                                       ©2011, 2016 GSI We grow up learning at play the skills we need for life, both alone and with other children. Then at a certain point we “grow up” and “stop playing games.”  Both phrases are not only used by some to describe the passage to adulthood, but can become psychologically negative...

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